The HR Toolkit for Addiction in the Workplace

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Next week, Compass Detox will be attending DisruptHR Miami. This event is a conference, of sorts, that brings together some of the top HR professionals from Florida and beyond. The purpose of this conference is to challenge those professionals to think beyond the normal HR structure, to confront them with issues, ideas, and situations that will spark thought, creativity, and leadership within their industries in tackling issues that some HR teams tend to neglect or shy away from.

We plan on bringing what is still a very stigmatized situation into the light at DisruptHR, and offering the solutions that these HR pros, and their peers, need when this situation becomes real.

Addiction carries with it some very unfortunate labels. Lazy, weak, careless, selfish, a liability. These words get tossed around a lot when the business world at large discusses addiction and the issues that come along with it. While none of these labels are anywhere near reality, they still exist and many opinions about a person are formed based around these labels when that person approaches someone for help or their identity as an addict is revealed in some way.

Suboxone for Opioid Addiction Treatment – Benefits & Risks

suboxone treatment for opioid addiction

Heroin is a highly addictive substance and use carries a number of risks including overdose and contracting communicable diseases. In an effort to reduce the number of overdoses and the spread of untreatable communicable diseases associated with the use of heroin and other opioids, pharmaceutical companies have developed drugs that interact with the brain similarly to opiates but do not carry the same risks. Suboxone is the brand name for one of the pharmaceutical drugs used for opioid addiction treatment.

What is Suboxone?

Suboxone is a medication that is a combination of 2 different substances: buprenorphine and naloxone. These substances react with the same receptors in the brain as opioid drugs. Naloxone will block the opioid receptors and prevent an overdose where buprenorphine will suppress cravings and limit the euphoric high associated with opiate use. When someone takes Suboxone they will essentially get a high that is less than heroin or fentanyl, they will not have the same cravings, and they will be much less likely to overdose. There is also a limit to the euphoric effects of suboxone so taking more will not produce a greater high. This removes the benefits of abusing the drug.

Why Me? | The Selective Nature of Addiction

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Addiction is an epidemic that has run rampant across humanity for centuries. Helen of Troy was said to have utilized opium, given to her by an Egyptian queen, in helping to treat the Greek warriors in Homer’s Odyssey – “…presently she cast a drug into the wine of which they drank to lull all pain and anger and bring forgetfulness of every sorrow.” Roman addictions, as well as Spartan and Greek, are well documented. To go “berserk” is a term that comes from Viking Berserkers, a much feared warrior who would rush into battle mostly nude, no matter the weather, incredibly high on psychedelic drugs to cancel out all fear and pain during battle. Yes, addiction has quite literally been a part of humanity since the earliest days of our existence.

Yet, despite that, addiction is not something that runs throughout humanity. There are many millions of humans alive today who seem to be immune to addiction. No matter what they do, or what they try, when they tire of it, or they just don’t feel like it anymore, they stop. Just like that. They drop it, they’re done, they never think about it again, nor do they suffer side effects from stopping whatever “it” was.

Signs of Cocaine Addiction

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As of 2017, the estimated 14.9% of people aged 12 and older have reported lifetime cocaine use. This means that an estimated 6 million Americans have used cocaine in their lifetime. Cocaine use often seems harmless at the beginning but it is a highly addictive substance that can lead to a number of physical, emotional, and social consequences. Being able to identify cocaine addiction in yourself or a loved once can be paramount to preventing a bad situation from getting worse.

Identifying Cocaine

Being able to identify cocaine and help you know what you are looking for if you find it in a loved one’s possession. There are 2 forms of cocaine, powered and crystalized (crack). Powdered cocaine is most commonly used and can be snorted, injected, or smoked. Crack cocaine is rock/crystal form of the drug that is typically smoked. Crack cocaine is more intense and the effects are felt quicker, but they also wear off quicker. Like many other odorless illicit drugs, cocaine is commonly stored in small plastic baggies.

The Heroin Journey

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“What’s going to happen to me?” It’s one of the most common questions we hear when the heroin addiction treatment process is in its beginning moments. And that makes perfect sense! Something that your body depends on to feel “good” and “normal” isn’t going to be available anymore. What does that mean for you? What will your body and mind go through? And what does a treatment facility do to help in that process?

While everyone’s treatment journey is unique, a few generalities exist. These include things that can be highlighted to help answer some of those burning questions about your journey from addiction to recovery, and what happens in between.

5 Ways Drug Addicts Play the Victim Role

Why Does Family Play Such an Important Role In Every Addict’s Journey?

By the time addiction has become truly problematic, a person will come up with a bunch sophisticated defense mechanisms to continue feeding his/her addiction. One of these defense mechanisms is playing the victim role.

Why do addicts play the victim?

Knowingly playing the victim role helps an addict to control and influence the thoughts and feelings of others, most commonly parents and spouses. An addict hardly copes with their actions — they’re ashamed or afraid to acknowledge this and seek help — so they justifies their actions as a way of controlling the situation.

Signs of Drug Abuse, Dependency and Addiction

Signs of Drug Abuse

How to recognize signs of drug abuse and addiction

The answer is not a simple one, especially in the initial phase of drug consumption when neither the psychological nor the physical health of a person haven’t been disrupted, and they’re still trying to keep old habits and leave the impression that everything is fine. If you suspect that you or someone you love is having a problem with substance abuse, there’s a list of universally accepted symptoms.

According to the World Drug Report, 29.5 million people worldwide suffer from drug use disorders. Even the first use of an illicit drug qualifies as drug abuse. It usually starts willfully, and most commonly due to curiosity, boredom, stress or depression. Addiction is a strong urge to obtain the use of illicit drugs regardless of the consequences, and it’s a product of prolonged drug abuse.

Why You Shouldn’t Try to Handle Your Heroin Addiction by Yourself

Why You Shouldn’t Try to Handle Your Heroin Addiction by Yourself

No matter how many times you tell yourself that you can quit on your own, getting over a heroin addiction isn’t that easy. Even when you think you’ve quit, you may fall back into substance abuse. If you have an addiction, you have a disease. And the only way to cure that disease is through professional treatment.

All You Need To Know About Heroin Addiction

Made from morphine, heroin is an illegal drug. Just like cocaine and morphine, is one of the top leading opiates and is abused by millions across the country. Just after one use, you can become highly addictive. Heroin can be smoked, snorted and even injected into the bloodstream.

What Are the Symptoms of Opioid Addiction

What Are the Symptoms of Opioid Addiction

It’s not always obvious when someone has an opioid addiction. Doctors use an 11-point checklist to figure out if there is an underlying problem to someone’s opioid use and if it’s time to go to a detox facility. Since the signs aren’t always clear, it’s important to take any strange habits or suspicions very seriously.

Opioid Addiction Checklist

Based on the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, if someone experiences at least two of the symptoms on the checklist within the past year, they most likely have an addiction to opioids.

How Quickly Can You Recover From Heroin Abuse?

How Quickly Can You Recover From Heroin Abuse?

It’s notoriously hard to recover from heroin abuse and addiction. There are happy stories about heroin recovery, but often, the stories are disheartening. How long it will take you to recover from heroin depends on a number of factors. Individuals dragging the chains of heroin addiction tend to suffer for years without relief and those who have apparently recovered are vulnerable and prone to relapse at any time, but with the right motivation and treatment—recovery is possible.

Why Heroin Addiction is so Difficult to Treat

Heroin withdrawal symptoms may vary among addicts, and various factors can affect how long they’ll last, but they’re extreme and incredibly uncomfortable in general. It’s often said that heroin withdrawal is like flu on steroids. The symptoms of withdrawal hit them with such an intense force that all they want to do is get back to the drug. Therefore, most people can’t make it through detox alone.