Coronavirus in Florida

Coronavirus is huge in the news these days. And people are understandably concerned. Where should you avoid going? Are large groups OK? Is it safe to be outside? Inside? How do you protect yourself with something that is such a massive mystery at the moment?

As Florida reports its first two confirmed cases of the Covid-19 strand of Coronavirus, and Governor DeSantis declares a state of emergency for the Sunshine State, we wanted to get ahead of this virus a bit and reassure our clients, both current and future, as well as their families, that we are monitoring the situation very closely and are more than prepared to keep our staff and clients safe.

In fact, our staff is a major reason that the Coronavirus will not be a major concern here at our facility.

The Battle for Sober

There is nothing easy about addiction. You struggle as you fall into its grip, it tears apart your life once you’re there, it will be one of the biggest fights of your life as you climb out of it, and staying sober? That is a daily battle.

You can battle it and overcome it, of that there is no doubt. At Compass we’ve seen the depths of addiction and how hard it is to come out of it. Those depths can be crazy and dark, but there is one part of addiction that stands out above the rest as truly “hard”. Time and time again, when asked what the hardest part of addiction and recovery is, addicts continue to point toward one event: admitting that you have a problem in the first place.

addiction during pride

Addiction and LGBTQ+

Life is hard. Even for the most successful amongst us, those with the biggest smiles and best careers, life can be tumultuous. Addicts know this all too well. It is one of our most often repeated mantras here at Compass – anyone can become addicted to drugs or alcohol. That means the officer who patrols your streets, the doctor who cares for your family, the pastor of your church, your therapist; anyone.

For people like that, untreated addiction can be a never ending torment. Not only is their body and mind under the control of a substance that is tearing them apart, but if that fact is ever found out, their professional, and in many cases personal, lives could come crashing down around them. One segment of the addict population that knows the horrid shock of that situation all too well is the LGBTQ+ community. For this community, simply being “outed” before they are ready can result in life altering repercussions.

How Can I Support My Nutrition During Heroin Detox?

Nutrition is an important part of our everyday life and is especially critical for those who are working to escape the grips of heroin addiction. Heroin use can take a major toll on the human body, mentally, physically, emotionally, and nutritionally. Consequently, supplementing one’s nutrition properly is an important aspect of the recovery process and should not be overlooked.

The human body’s ability to function is dependant on the presence of key nutrients: carbohydrates, proteins, fats, vitamins, minerals, and water. If the body does not receive an adequate amount of these nutrients, then the physiological effects can start to be observed in as little as days or weeks. In regards to water intake, even going 1 day without it can cause noticeable effects.

The HR Toolkit for Addiction in the Workplace

Next week, Compass Detox will be attending DisruptHR Miami. This event is a conference, of sorts, that brings together some of the top HR professionals from Florida and beyond. The purpose of this conference is to challenge those professionals to think beyond the normal HR structure, to confront them with issues, ideas, and situations that will spark thought, creativity, and leadership within their industries in tackling issues that some HR teams tend to neglect or shy away from.

We plan on bringing what is still a very stigmatized situation into the light at DisruptHR, and offering the solutions that these HR pros, and their peers, need when this situation becomes real.

Addiction carries with it some very unfortunate labels. Lazy, weak, careless, selfish, a liability. These words get tossed around a lot when the business world at large discusses addiction and the issues that come along with it. While none of these labels are anywhere near reality, they still exist and many opinions about a person are formed based around these labels when that person approaches someone for help or their identity as an addict is revealed in some way.

Medically Assisted Alcohol Detox

Understanding Medically Assisted Alcohol Detox

Have you ever drank too much one night and woke up the next morning with a pounding headache, sweating, and throwing up? Yes, I’m referring to a hangover.

Essentially, the way that alcohol interacts with your brain and the rest of your body throwing your biological systems out of balance. If you continue to drink heavily over an extended period of time, then your body beings to change the way it works to adapt to alcohol consumption. You will notice that over time you can drink more and more alcohol without experiencing a hangover. We refer to this as an alcohol tolerance. However, when you stop drinking alcohol, your body does not automatically go back to its regular balance. It takes time for your brain and body to re-adjust to a non-alcohol consumed state, resulting in a number of unpleasant and potentially dangerous symptoms.

Suboxone for Opioid Addiction Treatment – Benefits & Risks

Heroin is a highly addictive substance and use carries a number of risks including overdose and contracting communicable diseases. In an effort to reduce the number of overdoses and the spread of untreatable communicable diseases associated with the use of heroin and other opioids, pharmaceutical companies have developed drugs that interact with the brain similarly to opiates but do not carry the same risks. Suboxone is the brand name for one of the pharmaceutical drugs used for opioid addiction treatment.

What is Suboxone?

Suboxone is a medication that is a combination of 2 different substances: buprenorphine and naloxone. These substances react with the same receptors in the brain as opioid drugs. Naloxone will block the opioid receptors and prevent an overdose where buprenorphine will suppress cravings and limit the euphoric high associated with opiate use. When someone takes Suboxone they will essentially get a high that is less than heroin or fentanyl, they will not have the same cravings, and they will be much less likely to overdose. There is also a limit to the euphoric effects of suboxone so taking more will not produce a greater high. This removes the benefits of abusing the drug.

woman learns to seek medically assisted detox

When to Seek Medically Assisted Detox

One of the most unpleasant and deterring parts of detox is the withdrawal symptoms that can accompany it. Some people prefer to take detox on in their home as it is a familiar place where they have all their personal things. Others will detox in a facility that is designed and staffed to specifically support the drug and alcohol detox process. Many detox facilities offer medically assisted detox treatment to help manage withdrawal symptoms as best as possible. In fact, this type of treatment is one of the main reasons that individuals do often choose a detox facility over at-home detox.

What Does Medical Detox Involve?

Medical detox, or medically assisted detox, is a process that uses a mix of medical means and therapy to cleanse the body of any toxic substances and to give an individual’s body and mind a clean slate as they begin their sober life. The use of medications also manages many of the symptoms the accompany detox from various drugs and alcohol. Therapy can help with developing life skills to avoid relapse and identifying any underlying mental health disorders.

Why Me? | The Selective Nature of Addiction

Addiction is an epidemic that has run rampant across humanity for centuries. Helen of Troy was said to have utilized opium, given to her by an Egyptian queen, in helping to treat the Greek warriors in Homer’s Odyssey – “…presently she cast a drug into the wine of which they drank to lull all pain and anger and bring forgetfulness of every sorrow.” Roman addictions, as well as Spartan and Greek, are well documented. To go “berserk” is a term that comes from Viking Berserkers, a much feared warrior who would rush into battle mostly nude, no matter the weather, incredibly high on psychedelic drugs to cancel out all fear and pain during battle. Yes, addiction has quite literally been a part of humanity since the earliest days of our existence.

Yet, despite that, addiction is not something that runs throughout humanity. There are many millions of humans alive today who seem to be immune to addiction. No matter what they do, or what they try, when they tire of it, or they just don’t feel like it anymore, they stop. Just like that. They drop it, they’re done, they never think about it again, nor do they suffer side effects from stopping whatever “it” was.

woman sees the sign of cocaine addiction

Signs of Cocaine Addiction

As of 2017, the estimated 14.9% of people aged 12 and older have reported lifetime cocaine use. This means that an estimated 6 million Americans have used cocaine in their lifetime. Cocaine use often seems harmless at the beginning but it is a highly addictive substance that can lead to a number of physical, emotional, and social consequences. Being able to identify cocaine addiction in yourself or a loved once can be paramount to preventing a bad situation from getting worse.

Identifying Cocaine

Being able to identify cocaine and help you know what you are looking for if you find it in a loved one’s possession. There are 2 forms of cocaine, powered and crystalized (crack). Powdered cocaine is most commonly used and can be snorted, injected, or smoked. Crack cocaine is rock/crystal form of the drug that is typically smoked. Crack cocaine is more intense and the effects are felt quicker, but they also wear off quicker. Like many other odorless illicit drugs, cocaine is commonly stored in small plastic baggies.