Detoxing from Alcohol at Home

As of 2018, the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism reported that 15 million people in the United States have alcohol use disorder. As a chronic and relapsing brain disease, alcohol use disorder, or AUD, involves the compulsive use of alcohol, a loss of control over the amount of alcohol taken in, and an emotional state that is negative when not using alcohol.

Whether a person faces binge drinking, heavy drinking, or dependency on alcohol, it is very difficult to overcome an AUD. However, it is also extremely important for that person’s health and wellbeing. Unfortunately, quitting is not an easy process, and people who drink a considerable amount of alcohol are at risk of experiencing withdrawal symptoms.

Some people looking to overcome an alcohol use disorder choose to detox from alcohol at home. While this may be the only option for some, it is not the recommended method according to Alcohol.org, a resource from the American Addiction Centers. Keep reading to learn more about alcohol detox at home.

Alcohol Addiction and Covid-19

Many of us have been spending a bit more time on social media lately. Those of us that have will no doubt recognize the memes and posts jokingly pointing out the increased drinking that our friends, families, and coworkers are splashing all over their walls and feeds. While a lot of that is meant in jest, pointing out the frustrations that rise from boredom and the like, it does highlight yet another side effect of this Coronavirus pandemic – that addiction is taking hold in places that it never would have had this Covid-19 crisis not happened.

The Rise of Boredom & It’s Affect on Addicts

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Boredom. It’s a slippery slope, especially for addicts. It begins as something not so horrid, easily bypassed; but it can quickly turn into something that will destroy goals and ruin a solid mind. And when that boredom is forced upon you by authorities beyond your control, it can become unbearable.

Now, Compass Detox is open and ready to help guide you or your loved ones successfully through an addiction crisis. We can help you defeat that monster today! But, what if you’re not quite to that point yet. You feel boredom, and maybe loneliness, becoming a bit too much to handle, but you’re not in crisis mode just yet.

Well, this is the situation that this blog is geared toward today.

No More Fix: A Drug Addict’s Crisis

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As more and more parts of our nation move into “stay at home” orders and normal movement becomes difficult, law enforcement and National Guard presence become much more prominent, and all of the other bits of loveliness that can come along with a crisis, daily life and habits are thrown into disarray.

A favorite restaurant for Friday night dinner is no longer open. A little thrift store that always has amazing treasures sits dark and empty. A park that was great for a run or walk is roped off. Life as you know it is different right now, and there are a million examples of how different it is. Some of them not so savory.

For addicts who are in the grip of their addiction, these tighter controls, increased law enforcement presence, and new travel restrictions can mean that their sources for supplying their drug of choice have run dry as well.

The Battle for Sober

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There is nothing easy about addiction. You struggle as you fall into its grip, it tears apart your life once you’re there, it will be one of the biggest fights of your life as you climb out of it, and staying sober? That is a daily battle.

You can battle it and overcome it, of that there is no doubt. At Compass we’ve seen the depths of addiction and how hard it is to come out of it. Those depths can be crazy and dark, but there is one part of addiction that stands out above the rest as truly “hard”. Time and time again, when asked what the hardest part of addiction and recovery is, addicts continue to point toward one event: admitting that you have a problem in the first place.

How To Love An Addict

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Addiction not only rips apart a life, it does the same thing to the relationships and loved ones held most dear by the addict.

It is a very difficult thing to watch a loved one slip into addiction. Suddenly, someone that you once knew so well has become a completely different person, a person that you can’t trust, a person who seems to fight every helping hand and seek out every harmful situation they can possibly find, a person who pushes away love, a person who pushes away you. You know that this is the addiction working, taking control, but you can’t help but be affected by it. You can’t help feeling hurt, angry, helpless. You can’t help feeling like you want to give up.

And, unfortunately, many people do give up. They try and try until they’ve had enough – enough betrayal, enough rejection, enough hurt. Their addict loved one has hurt them so many times, maybe even betrayed their trust as well, that the need to protect themselves from more hurt and more harm has overtaken the love that they feel for this person who has been changed so drastically by addiction. And they give up. They cut ties, they banish, they forget, they toss aside.