How Long Does Alcohol Stay in Your System?

How Long Does Alcohol Stay in Your System

Finding out how long alcohol can stay in your system is a common question. After all, you do not want to risk trying to drive if there is still any alcohol left in your system. Unfortunately, the answer depends on many different factors. You need to measure how much you were drinking, the proof of the alcohol, and your body size as starters. How well your kidneys and liver function also factor into how long alcohol can stay in your system. Then there is the factor of how old you are, whether you are male or female, and if you ate anything before or while drinking.

Thankfully, there is a pretty good rule to follow should drinking be a part of your regular routine. Most people will have no residual alcohol left after 2-4 hours if they were drinking a can or two of beer in that time. Anything more than that, the time goes up exponentially. The best way to be sure that there is never any alcohol in your system is to stop drinking. That way, any time you need to go out, you know it is safe to do so without putting yourself, or anyone else around you, at risk.

6 Reasons Not to Detox from Alcohol on Your Own

6 Reasons Not to Detox from Alcohol on Your Own

If you have made the choice to get sober, that is amazing. Many people live their entire lives and never even admit they have an alcohol addiction. You are already on the right path and you should be extremely proud of yourself for this decision. Now that you have made this decision, you can decide to detox with an outpatient detox program, inpatient detox program, or detox on your own at home.

With this being said, there are some things that you need to think about when deciding where you are going to detox. You need to consider your safety, the comfort of getting sober, and your alcohol abuse history. You should also consider your past, current, and future health. While taking these things into consideration, it is helpful to know some of the reasons why you shouldn’t detox from alcohol on your own.

How Long Does it Take to Detox from Alcohol?

Alcohol Detox Timeline

When a person decides to stop drinking, they are likely to experience alcohol withdrawal symptoms. The detox process for alcohol can take several days or several weeks, depending on multiple individual factors. Alcohol detox will be different for everybody, but there are some common symptoms to expect during this time. Keep reading to learn more about the timeline for alcohol detox and treatment options for those with an alcohol use disorder.

What is alcohol detox?

Alcohol detox is an important step in treating an alcohol use disorder. The process involves flushing alcohol from the body completely and results in withdrawal symptoms. When someone’s body becomes dependent on alcohol over time, they develop alcoholism or an alcohol use disorder. Because your body is receiving chemicals from alcohol, your brain stops producing those specific chemicals, causing a dependency.

Making the decision to quit drinking is far from easy, but it is crucial to a person’s health and overall wellbeing. Prolonged alcohol consumption in excessive amounts leads to a buildup of toxins and waste products in the body. Alcohol detox begins the addiction treatment process as the body rids itself of toxins.

Here’s Why Alcohol Withdrawal Can Be Deadly

Alcohol Withdrawal can be Deadly

There is a lot of information circulating about alcohol detox and withdrawal symptoms. The jumble of details can be confusing for those dealing with an alcohol use disorder and their loved ones. Alcohol abuse is dangerous, damages the body, and impacts a person’s entire life. Detoxing from alcohol is a necessary first step towards recovery and sobriety. However, alcohol detox can also lead to withdrawal. For the most part, alcohol withdrawal is uncomfortable and difficult, but not deadly. There is no way for someone to know how their body will handle alcohol detox unless they consult a doctor, though. Some people with alcohol use disorders are at a higher risk for delirium tremens and potentially fatal withdrawal symptoms. With proper care and medically-supervised treatment, the effects of alcohol withdrawal can be minimized in a safe environment. Keep reading to learn why alcohol withdrawal can be deadly and how to safely detox from alcohol.

Alcoholism Fast Facts: What is it, Side Effects, Treatment Options & How to Help

Alcoholism Fast Facts

Alcohol use disorders occur at varying levels of severity, and alcohol abuse can cause serious problems in a person’s daily life. Substance abuse can graduate to dependence when drinking habits become out of control, putting someone’s physical and mental health at risk even more. Alcohol use disorders can build up over many years or become severe in much shorter timeframes. No two people experience alcohol abuse and the effects of alcoholism the same.

If you or someone you know is suffering from alcoholism, it can be difficult to understand the impact substance abuse has on a person’s life. From defining alcoholism and dependence to learning the symptoms of withdrawal, alcoholism can be scary and dangerous for all involved. Keep reading to learn more about alcohol dependence, including treatment options.

What is Alcohol and Drug Detox?

Alcohol and Drug Detox

A substance use disorder is a clinical term used to describe addiction to drugs or alcohol. According to guidelines set forth in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition, withdrawal is one of the diagnostic criteria for a substance use disorder. Withdrawal, which occurs when people with addictions stop using drugs or alcohol, involves unpleasant symptoms as a result of the substance of abuse no longer being active in the body.

When a person enters withdrawal, he or she may experience painful symptoms, making it difficult to permanently stop using the substance of abuse. In fact, people may return to drug or alcohol use to avoid withdrawal symptoms. In cases where a person wants to stop using drugs and/or alcohol but withdrawal symptoms are making the process more challenging, an alcohol and drug detox program may be necessary to manage symptoms and begin the journey toward lasting recovery. Detox programs can also provide life-saving medical treatment in cases where withdrawal becomes dangerous.

Alcohol Detox in Florida

Alcohol detox center in Florida

For a person who has been suffering from moderate to severe alcohol addiction, detox is a daunting reality. Withdrawal symptoms can be more than uncomfortable, they can be dangerous too. However, continuing to drink can cause more long-term damage to your mind, body, and relationships. If you have to detox from alcohol, you might at well do it at an alcohol detox center in Florida. Florida alcohol detox centers have a combination of benefits that no other detox centers can offer.

Alcohol Detox Centers in Florida are More Inviting

Detox and recovery are scary enough on its own, but it’s small things like the location that can help an addict get comfortable with the idea of entering an alcohol detox program (like the program being in Florida). As opposed to a gray, rainy or snowy location, when someone thinks of recovery in Florida they can think of palm trees and warm, sunny weather. There is a reason Florida is known as a state people retire to: it is comfortable and downright inviting.

How to Pay for Drug or Alcohol Detox Treatment & Rehab

how-to-pay-for-detox

Drug & alcohol detox treatment is easier and safer at a medical detox center, but it also is not inexpensive. Requiring 24/7 monitoring and care, medication, a room, food, and more, there is a lot to offering detox treatment. Additionally, detox is typically followed by residential or outpatient treatment that, depending on the level of care and location, can be costly as well. If you are looking to get treatment for yourself or a loved one, but you are not sure how payment works, here is a quick look at the options:

Private Insurance

Depending on the provider and plan, private insurance will cover some or most of your treatment at a detox center or another addiction rehab center. The majority of treatment facilities accept insurance from all major providers including United Healthcare, Aetna, Cigna, Blue Cross and Blue Shield. Whether you are enrolled in an insurance plan via your employer, directly through the insurance provider, or through healthcare.gov, there is a good chance you have coverage.