6 Reasons Not to Detox from Alcohol on Your Own

6 Reasons Not to Detox from Alcohol on Your Own

If you have made the choice to get sober, that is amazing. Many people live their entire lives and never even admit they have an alcohol addiction. You are already on the right path and you should be extremely proud of yourself for this decision. Now that you have made this decision, you can decide to detox with an outpatient detox program, inpatient detox program, or detox on your own at home.

With this being said, there are some things that you need to think about when deciding where you are going to detox. You need to consider your safety, the comfort of getting sober, and your alcohol abuse history. You should also consider your past, current, and future health. While taking these things into consideration, it is helpful to know some of the reasons why you shouldn’t detox from alcohol on your own.

Exercise and Addiction Recovery: 9 Benefits + Exercise Tips

Exercise and Addiction Recovery

If you have made the decision to detox from drugs & alochol, the process can seem daunting. Withdrawal symptoms and cravings can make it difficult to stay on course with detox and recovery. For many going through detox from drugs & alcohol, there is a need to fill the void left by substances. Recent data suggests that exercise can help remove toxins from the body, lessen stress, and improve overall health during and after drug detox. While it is always best to consult your doctor for specific guidance and advice regarding drug detox, you can keep reading for some tips on exercising during detox.

Benefits of Exercise for Drug Detox

Exercise is good for you – we all know that. But for individuals struggling with drug addiction or going through detox, exercise can have a wide range of benefits beyond weight management or building muscle. Incorporating exercise into your daily routine can help your body heal from substance abuse while naturally detoxing.

Nutritional and Vitamin Therapy is Essential in Alcohol Detox and Alcoholism Recovery

Nutritional and Vitamin Therapy is Essential in Alcohol Detox and Alcoholism Recovery

Imagine this: you have a few drinks with some friends and you have a great night. You do this again every weekend. Every weekend turns into weekdays, sometimes with your friends and sometimes in your living room alone. Some days, you start drinking in the morning to get your day started and suddenly, you can’t live without a drink in your hand.

More than 75,000 deaths annually are attributed to the excessive consumption of alcohol, according to Ralph W. Hingson, a Professor at the Boston University School of Public Health. Excessive Alcohol Consumption is also the third leading preventable cause of death in the United States.

Alcoholism (AUD) is a chronic disease characterized by the inability to control drinking due to both a physical and emotional dependence on alcohol. Those who struggle with alcoholism feel as though they cannot function normally without alcohol. In turn, this affects their professional goals, personal matters, and the family and friends in their lives.

How Long Does it Take to Detox from Alcohol?

Alcohol Detox Timeline

When a person decides to stop drinking, they are likely to experience alcohol withdrawal symptoms. The detox process for alcohol can take several days or several weeks, depending on multiple individual factors. Alcohol detox will be different for everybody, but there are some common symptoms to expect during this time. Keep reading to learn more about the timeline for alcohol detox and treatment options for those with an alcohol use disorder.

What is alcohol detox?

Alcohol detox is an important step in treating an alcohol use disorder. The process involves flushing alcohol from the body completely and results in withdrawal symptoms. When someone’s body becomes dependent on alcohol over time, they develop alcoholism or an alcohol use disorder. Because your body is receiving chemicals from alcohol, your brain stops producing those specific chemicals, causing a dependency.

Making the decision to quit drinking is far from easy, but it is crucial to a person’s health and overall wellbeing. Prolonged alcohol consumption in excessive amounts leads to a buildup of toxins and waste products in the body. Alcohol detox begins the addiction treatment process as the body rids itself of toxins.

Does Alcohol Withdrawal Cause Depression?

Alcohol Withdrawal Depression

There isn’t any doubt that people who suffer from an alcohol use disorder feel a lot better after they stop. There are several recovery stories demonstrating how incredible life may feel when someone has placed their addiction to alcohol behind them. That being said, it’s important to note that there’s frequently an extremely difficult phase an alcoholic undergoes before they start to feel better. This occurs directly after cessation, typically within less than one day since their last drink. It’s called Alcohol Withdrawal Syndrome. Individuals who’ve only used alcohol for a brief time, or who’ve only consumed small amounts of alcohol, might not experience the most unpleasant withdrawal symptoms. Some will only suffer a “crash” or a hangover right after intoxication wears off, which they might “sleep off” during the weekend. For the infrequent or limited drinkers that typically only drink for a limited period of time, they may be lucky and have the ability to stop and not undergo the worst of what alcohol withdrawal has to offer.

Does Alcohol Withdrawal Cause Insomnia?

Does Alcohol Withdrawal Cause Insomnia

When cutting alcohol out of your life, it can lead to a wide array of symptoms. Your body becomes dependent on the alcohol over time. Taking that alcohol away means your body is going to have to readjust. Many people struggle with the symptoms of alcohol withdrawal. That is why going to an alcohol detox facility or rehabilitation facility to stop using or abusing alcohol is so important. If you want to get over an alcohol addiction, we are here to help. Here are some of the most important things to know about alcohol withdrawal.

The symptoms of alcohol withdrawal a person faces is going to be as unique as the person giving up alcohol. Each person’s journey through alcohol detox will depend on many different factors. These include:

Alcohol Tremors “The Shakes”: Fast Facts, Causes and Treatment

Alcohol Shakes (Tremors) Fast Facts - Causes and Treatment

In moderation, alcohol can be part of a healthy lifestyle. Government guidelines define moderate alcohol consumption as one daily alcoholic beverage for women, and up to two drinks per day for men. Excessive alcohol use, on the other hand, can become problematic and lead to an alcohol addiction, which professionals call an alcohol use disorder. The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th edition, (DSM-5) describes the signs of an alcohol use disorder. These include symptoms such as cravings for alcohol, difficulty cutting down on drinking, and continuing to drink, even when it causes problems with work or family. Another sign of an alcohol use disorder is experiencing symptoms of withdrawal when alcohol begins to leave the body. One such withdrawal symptom is tremors, or “the shakes.”

Here’s Why Alcohol Withdrawal Can Be Deadly

Alcohol Withdrawal can be Deadly

There is a lot of information circulating about alcohol detox and withdrawal symptoms. The jumble of details can be confusing for those dealing with an alcohol use disorder and their loved ones. Alcohol abuse is dangerous, damages the body, and impacts a person’s entire life. Detoxing from alcohol is a necessary first step towards recovery and sobriety. However, alcohol detox can also lead to withdrawal. For the most part, alcohol withdrawal is uncomfortable and difficult, but not deadly. There is no way for someone to know how their body will handle alcohol detox unless they consult a doctor, though. Some people with alcohol use disorders are at a higher risk for delirium tremens and potentially fatal withdrawal symptoms. With proper care and medically-supervised treatment, the effects of alcohol withdrawal can be minimized in a safe environment. Keep reading to learn why alcohol withdrawal can be deadly and how to safely detox from alcohol.

Alcoholism Fast Facts: What is it, Side Effects, Treatment Options & How to Help

Alcoholism Fast Facts

Alcohol use disorders occur at varying levels of severity, and alcohol abuse can cause serious problems in a person’s daily life. Substance abuse can graduate to dependence when drinking habits become out of control, putting someone’s physical and mental health at risk even more. Alcohol use disorders can build up over many years or become severe in much shorter timeframes. No two people experience alcohol abuse and the effects of alcoholism the same.

If you or someone you know is suffering from alcoholism, it can be difficult to understand the impact substance abuse has on a person’s life. From defining alcoholism and dependence to learning the symptoms of withdrawal, alcoholism can be scary and dangerous for all involved. Keep reading to learn more about alcohol dependence, including treatment options.

5 Things That Make Alcohol Withdrawal Dangerous: What Happens?

5 Things That Make Alcohol Withdrawal Dangerous - What Happens

Alcohol dependence occurs in one out of every 12 adults in America. As the most-used addictive substance in the United States, a dependence on alcohol can be very dangerous and affect a wide range of people. When someone is unable to control their drinking habits, they develop an alcohol use disorder.

As alcohol abuse progresses and a tolerance is built up, it takes larger quantities of alcohol to achieve a similar effect. Alcohol dependence occurs when someone experiences cravings for alcohol or withdrawal symptoms when they stop drinking. While alcohol detox is a necessary part of the recovery process for alcohol use disorders, alcohol withdrawal can be very dangerous.

People attempting to detox from alcohol should not go through the process alone. Medical supervision can help protect patients as they experience withdrawal symptoms. Alcohol withdrawal syndrome can be dangerous and potentially life-threatening if handled without proper treatment. Keep reading to learn the top five reasons why alcohol withdrawal is dangerous.

What is Alcohol and Drug Detox?

Alcohol and Drug Detox

A substance use disorder is a clinical term used to describe addiction to drugs or alcohol. According to guidelines set forth in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition, withdrawal is one of the diagnostic criteria for a substance use disorder. Withdrawal, which occurs when people with addictions stop using drugs or alcohol, involves unpleasant symptoms as a result of the substance of abuse no longer being active in the body.

When a person enters withdrawal, he or she may experience painful symptoms, making it difficult to permanently stop using the substance of abuse. In fact, people may return to drug or alcohol use to avoid withdrawal symptoms. In cases where a person wants to stop using drugs and/or alcohol but withdrawal symptoms are making the process more challenging, an alcohol and drug detox program may be necessary to manage symptoms and begin the journey toward lasting recovery. Detox programs can also provide life-saving medical treatment in cases where withdrawal becomes dangerous.