Does Alcohol Withdrawal Cause Fever?

Does Alcohol Withdrawal Cause Fever

What is fever? Fever is one of the body’s most original defenses against infection or assault. The technical definition, for medical practitioners, defines this as a core body temperature of 100.4-100.9 F, which is about 3 degrees higher than what is considered a normal temperature. Other terms, such as hyperthermia and pyrexia, are also used interchangeably, although the understanding of these two terms does not have any precise definition. However, what is more useful and interesting to understand is what causes a fever and why it is occurring.

What causes fever?

When the body notices a foreign intruder, such as bacteria (known as sepsis), it releases tiny components of the immune system that act on the brain as a signal to increase temperature. This area of the brain is always in direct contact with circulating blood in the body, which renders it capable of performing this form of surveillance.

Sometimes, toxins produced by bacteria can act on this area of the brain directly to trigger this response. This is actually a very fine-tuned evolutionary mechanism, raises temperatures above what bacteria and fungi can survive without harming body cells themselves, as well as allows for key parts of the immune system to become widely circulated. In a fortunate coincidence, antibiotic drugs also work better at these higher temperatures.

Does Alcohol Withdrawal Cause Seizures?

Alcohol Withdrawal Causes Seizures

While people can safely enjoy moderate amounts of alcohol without becoming addicted, those who drink heavily may develop a tolerance for alcohol and eventually become dependent on it. In some cases, heavy alcohol use can lead to a clinical condition called an alcohol use disorder. One symptom of an alcohol use disorder, according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5), is withdrawal. This happens when a person stops drinking and experiences uncomfortable symptoms such as sleep problems, nausea, and tremors as alcohol leaves the body. In some cases, alcohol withdrawal can lead to seizures, but not everyone who undergoes withdrawal will have a seizure.

Symptoms & Stages of Alcohol Withdrawal

The Stages of Alcohol Withdrawal

Alcohol detox can be just as frightening as alcoholism. For those who suffer from severe alcohol use disorders and alcohol dependency, getting sober can seem like an up-hill battle. Alcohol detox is an intense and often uncomfortable process, and withdrawal symptoms can range from mild to severe. However, making the decision to stop drinking is a great first step towards recovery.

While alcohol withdrawal can be dangerous, it is possible to safely detox from alcohol. The timeline and symptoms of alcohol detox vary by individual, but there are three common stages. Detoxing from alcohol in a medically-supervised environment can be a safe and effective way to get sober and avoid deadly withdrawal symptoms. Keep reading to learn more about the stages of alcohol detox and how to safely maneuver through alcohol withdrawal syndrome.

Alcohol Tremors “The Shakes”: Fast Facts, Causes and Treatment

Alcohol Shakes (Tremors) Fast Facts - Causes and Treatment

In moderation, alcohol can be part of a healthy lifestyle. Government guidelines define moderate alcohol consumption as one daily alcoholic beverage for women, and up to two drinks per day for men. Excessive alcohol use, on the other hand, can become problematic and lead to an alcohol addiction, which professionals call an alcohol use disorder. The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th edition, (DSM-5) describes the signs of an alcohol use disorder. These include symptoms such as cravings for alcohol, difficulty cutting down on drinking, and continuing to drink, even when it causes problems with work or family. Another sign of an alcohol use disorder is experiencing symptoms of withdrawal when alcohol begins to leave the body. One such withdrawal symptom is tremors, or “the shakes.”

Here’s Why Alcohol Withdrawal Can Be Deadly

Alcohol Withdrawal can be Deadly

There is a lot of information circulating about alcohol detox and withdrawal symptoms. The jumble of details can be confusing for those dealing with an alcohol use disorder and their loved ones. Alcohol abuse is dangerous, damages the body, and impacts a person’s entire life. Detoxing from alcohol is a necessary first step towards recovery and sobriety. However, alcohol detox can also lead to withdrawal. For the most part, alcohol withdrawal is uncomfortable and difficult, but not deadly. There is no way for someone to know how their body will handle alcohol detox unless they consult a doctor, though. Some people with alcohol use disorders are at a higher risk for delirium tremens and potentially fatal withdrawal symptoms. With proper care and medically-supervised treatment, the effects of alcohol withdrawal can be minimized in a safe environment. Keep reading to learn why alcohol withdrawal can be deadly and how to safely detox from alcohol.

Alcoholism Fast Facts: What is it, Side Effects, Treatment Options & How to Help

Alcoholism Fast Facts

Alcohol use disorders occur at varying levels of severity, and alcohol abuse can cause serious problems in a person’s daily life. Substance abuse can graduate to dependence when drinking habits become out of control, putting someone’s physical and mental health at risk even more. Alcohol use disorders can build up over many years or become severe in much shorter timeframes. No two people experience alcohol abuse and the effects of alcoholism the same.

If you or someone you know is suffering from alcoholism, it can be difficult to understand the impact substance abuse has on a person’s life. From defining alcoholism and dependence to learning the symptoms of withdrawal, alcoholism can be scary and dangerous for all involved. Keep reading to learn more about alcohol dependence, including treatment options.

5 Things That Make Alcohol Withdrawal Dangerous: What Happens?

5 Things That Make Alcohol Withdrawal Dangerous - What Happens

Alcohol dependence occurs in one out of every 12 adults in America. As the most-used addictive substance in the United States, a dependence on alcohol can be very dangerous and affect a wide range of people. When someone is unable to control their drinking habits, they develop an alcohol use disorder.

As alcohol abuse progresses and a tolerance is built up, it takes larger quantities of alcohol to achieve a similar effect. Alcohol dependence occurs when someone experiences cravings for alcohol or withdrawal symptoms when they stop drinking. While alcohol detox is a necessary part of the recovery process for alcohol use disorders, alcohol withdrawal can be very dangerous.

People attempting to detox from alcohol should not go through the process alone. Medical supervision can help protect patients as they experience withdrawal symptoms. Alcohol withdrawal syndrome can be dangerous and potentially life-threatening if handled without proper treatment. Keep reading to learn the top five reasons why alcohol withdrawal is dangerous.

What is Alcohol and Drug Detox?

Alcohol and Drug Detox

A substance use disorder is a clinical term used to describe addiction to drugs or alcohol. According to guidelines set forth in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition, withdrawal is one of the diagnostic criteria for a substance use disorder. Withdrawal, which occurs when people with addictions stop using drugs or alcohol, involves unpleasant symptoms as a result of the substance of abuse no longer being active in the body.

When a person enters withdrawal, he or she may experience painful symptoms, making it difficult to permanently stop using the substance of abuse. In fact, people may return to drug or alcohol use to avoid withdrawal symptoms. In cases where a person wants to stop using drugs and/or alcohol but withdrawal symptoms are making the process more challenging, an alcohol and drug detox program may be necessary to manage symptoms and begin the journey toward lasting recovery. Detox programs can also provide life-saving medical treatment in cases where withdrawal becomes dangerous.

Delirium Tremens (DTs): Symptoms, Causes, Duration, and Treatment

Delirium Tremens

Alcohol use is common in the United States, with slightly over half of adults indicating they had consumed an alcoholic beverage during the past month as of 2018. What is less common, however, is alcohol addiction and its consequences, as roughly 6 percent of adults in the United States have a diagnosable addiction called an alcohol use disorder, according to the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism.

Ongoing alcohol abuse and addiction can lead to significant consequences, such as health problems, serious injuries, and difficulty functioning in work or family life. Another consequence of alcohol abuse is dependence, meaning that the body does not function well without alcohol. When a person who develops an alcohol dependence stops drinking, he or she will typically experience withdrawal. One serious form of withdrawal, called delirium tremens, can be fatal; however, proper medical care can prevent complications from delirium tremens and allow those living with alcohol addictions to participate in ongoing treatment to achieve lasting sobriety.

Alcohol (ETOH) Withdrawal Syndrome: Symptoms, Treatment, and Detox Time

Alcohol Withdrawal Syndrome

Alcohol abuse is common in the United States. According to recent data from the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, 5.8 percent of adults in the United States have an alcohol use disorder, which is the term used to describe a diagnosable alcohol addiction. One of the signs of an alcohol use disorder is experiencing withdrawal symptoms in the absence of alcohol, meaning that once a person stops drinking for a period, withdrawal will begin. Reports from American Family Physician suggest that each year, about 2 million Americans will experience some sort of alcohol withdrawal. This can range from mild symptoms to severe withdrawal conditions that require hospitalization.

How Do Detox Facilities Alleviate Withdrawal Symptoms?

How Do Detox Facilities Alleviate Withdrawal Symptoms?

Detoxing from alcohol or drugs is a difficult time for anyone with an addiction, especially with the withdrawal symptoms that usually come soon afterward. These symptoms can be both physically and emotionally draining for someone.

A lot of people who want to sober up put it off because of the withdrawal process and its effects. Whether they have gone through it previously or know from someone else’s experience, this fear stops many from going through detox. However, detox facilities are trained to know what strategies will lessen these symptoms.

How to Recognize Alcohol Withdrawal

How to Recognize Alcohol Withdrawal

When alcohol intake becomes an addiction, it can be a trying task to let go of the urge to have the next drink. Not only does your body go through emotional changes during your detoxification process, but the physiology of your body changes as well. If one has been dependant on alcohol for a longer period of time, the body begins to adapt (while still having a negative impact). So, what happens when you decide to remove alcohol from your system?

A breakdown of alcohol withdrawal

Withdrawal can occur within eight hours of the last drink. The first few days tend to be the most difficult to deal with, as your body is experiencing a drastic change from its previous routine. During this time, you may experience: